Understanding the Emergence of Ebola Virus Disease in Sierra Leone: Stalking the Virus in the Threatening Wake of Emergence

Understanding the Emergence of Ebola Virus Disease in Sierra Leone: Stalking the Virus in the Threatening Wake of Emergence

Nadia Wauquier, James Bangura, Lina Moses, Sheik Humarr Khan, Moinya Coomber, Victor Lungay, Michael Gbakie, Mohammed S.K. Sesay, Ibrahim A.K. Gassama, James L.B. Massally, Aiah Gbakima, James Squire, Mohamed Lamin, Lansana Kanneh, Mohammed Yillah, Kandeh Kargbo, Willie Roberts, Mohammed Vandi, David Kargbo, Tom Vincent, Amara Jambai, Mary Guttieri, Joseph Fair, Marc Souris, Jean Paul Gonzalez

PLOS Current Outbreaks APRIL 20, 2015

Since Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) was first identified in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo, and despite the numerous outbreaks recorded to date, rarely has an epidemic origin been identified. Indeed, among the twenty-one most documented EVD outbreaks in Africa, an index case has been identified four times, and hypothesized in only two other instances. The initial steps of emergence and spread of a virus are critical in the development of a potential outbreak and need to be thoroughly dissected and understood in order to improve on preventative strategies. In the current West African outbreak of EVD, a unique index case has been identified, pinpointing the geographical origin of the epidemic in Guinea. Herein, we provide an accounting of events that serve as the footprint of EVD emergence in Sierra Leone and a road map for risk mitigation fueled by lessons learned. READ MORE

No Comments

Post A Comment